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Monday, October 18

  1. page The Challenges of Independence edited ... - -- {America.png} {America.png} {01.png} All A. American Revolution ends in 1783: Bri…
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    A. American Revolution ends in 1783: Britain surrenders & America gained their independence.
    So now that the Revolution has ended, this gives America an opportunity to run their government on Democracy.
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    http://www.flickr.com/photos/designldg/2669515474/
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/neilhinchley/200362348/
    Group members: Elizabeth Garcia, Mike Mendenhall, Nozomi Nakamura, Ismael Rodriguez, Jennifer Tran
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    6:50 am
  2. page Revolutions in Haiti and Latin America edited Revolutions in Haiti and Latin America {http://www.frenchcreoles.com/420px-Toussaint_L'Ouvertur…

    Revolutions in Haiti and Latin America
    {http://www.frenchcreoles.com/420px-Toussaint_L'Ouverture.jpg}{http://www.frenchcreoles.com/420px-Toussaint_L%27Ouverture.jpg}
    The Haitian Revolution (1791-1804)
    Why it began: The Haitan Revolution began beause rich white planters and gens de couleur (Free non-white Haitian men & women) wanted more "economic freedom" and "home rule" (Bulliet et al. 537-8). Additionally, "political turmoil in France weakened colonial authority, permitting rich planters, poor whites, gens de couleur, and slaves to pursue their narrow interests, in an increasingly bitter and confrontational struggle" (Bulliet et al. 537).
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    When Haiti became independent, other countries refused to recognize the outcome out of fear for their own economic state.
    ReferencesPicture(s): http://www.frenchcreoles.com/420px-Toussaint_L'Ouverture.jpgBulliet, Richard W.et al. The Earth and Its Peoples: a Global History. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2009. 537-40. Print.Dr. Alyssa Sepinwall. (In-class Lecture): 10/13/2010.
    Group members: Brandon Cooper, Kidus Deju, Celeste Hernandez, Cole Massey, Eric Tiegs

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    6:49 am
  3. page Declaration of the Rights of Man edited ... The Human Record, Andrea Overfield Photo from: http://www.cla.calpoly.edu/~lcall/111/Declarat…
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    The Human Record, Andrea Overfield
    Photo from: http://www.cla.calpoly.edu/~lcall/111/Declaration_Rights_of_Man.jpg
    Group Members: Ryan Jensen, Jack Larocca, Deborah Nealon, Jessica Prendergast, Amanda Tschantz

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    6:48 am
  4. page Bolivar's Dreams for Latin America edited ... In the lectures by Sepinwall on Monday she stated that after the American, French and Latin Am…
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    In the lectures by Sepinwall on Monday she stated that after the American, French and Latin American Revolutions, one of their biggest challenges was establishing a working and productive system of government. She stated that this type of change was harder because when a society has become accustomed to one system of government and laws, it takes a lot of time to change all this and make laws that are suitable for everyone. She also stated that after the American Revolution it took two drafts of the Constitution before they got it right, whereas after the French and Latin American Revolutions it took them constant tries before establishing a working government.
    In the document Bolivar also states at the end his desire for a great republic and that he believed success for the Americas was possible. Even for our country now, Based on our system of government, our economy and the fact that we are one of the most developed countries in the world, it is safe to say his ideas on government were correct. It was interesting to see how someone of the past could predict such an important part of our future.
    Group members: Sam Blumenshine, Melissa Cantrell, Shane Hurley, James Sebring and Maria Tello
    Notes:
    11. Photo from: http://www.myartprints.co.uk/a/anonymous/simon-bolivar-1783-1830-c.html
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    6:47 am

Saturday, October 16

  1. page Visiting Historical Websites edited ... *These are to not to be used to criticize a group’s wikispace page but as a tool to help stude…
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    *These are to not to be used to criticize a group’s wikispace page but as a tool to help students think about web page content and design.
    Top 10 Things to Think About When Reading Historical Websites
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    is the websiteswebsite's name? www.csusm.edu
    2. Confirm the sponsor or creator of the website. Is it an academic website supported by a University or scholar?
    3. Check the date of the website? When was the last time it was updated?
    4. Look for who wrote the text or conducted the research? Do you recognize the name?
    5. Are the researcher’s qualifications or credentials accessible?
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    page. Are theirthere links to
    7. Does the website have a bibliography or works cited list?
    8. Are theirthere links to
    9. Does the website include or refer to past research or historiography on the topic?
    10. Is the website’s objective or argument clear? Is there an obvious bias?
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    7:18 am

Friday, October 15

  1. page The Challenges of Independence edited ... - -- - -- - -- - {America.png} {01.png} All Rights Reserved. © KayEllen. A. American Rev…
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    {America.png} {01.png} All Rights Reserved. © KayEllen.
    A. American Revolution ends in 1783: Britain surrenders & America gained their independence.
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    10:33 am
  2. page The Challenges of Independence edited ... -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - -- - {America.png} {America.png} {01.png} …
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    A. American Revolution ends in 1783: Britain surrenders & America gained their independence.
    So now that the Revolution has ended, this gives America an opportunity to run their government on Democracy.
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    C. Slavery still existed
    Since the Haitian Revolution elaborated on freedom of Slavery, America did not want to have anything to do with Haiti. They believed that with the slave revolt, it would influence the slaves in America and they might revolt too. So, the Slave owners began to tighten their hold on their slaves for fear of an uprising.
    D. North &South divided the nation; the South became its own nation known as "The Confederate States of America."
    Only one state wanted to abolish slavery and that was New Jersey; however, other states were angered by this so, the decision was overruled. Although, America gained Independence as a nation,
    the states were divided based off disagreements, especially the slavery issue. South wanted slaves, but North didn't. So, the South renamed themselves as "The Confederate States of America."

    {French.png}
    {02.png} A. Declaration of the Rights of ManThe "The Declaration of Rights of Man" is similar to the Declaration of Independence of America. It was used to keep the society stable in the aftermath of the Revolution. Some of the natural rights were " 'liberty, property, security, and resistance, to oppression.' " In addition, "the Declaration of Rights of Man also guaranteed free expression of ideas, equality before the law, and representative government" (Earth 532).B. French Revolution was ended by overthrow of the monar chy, execution of Louis XVI, &National Convention.Just like the American Revolution, the French wanted more of a democracy. In 1792, the Legislative Assembly imprisoned Louis XVI for his behavior and called for the National Convention. The National Convention is based off of all voted by men; with all new elected people, they convicted Louis XVI.C. Napoleon BonaparteNapoleon Bonaparte was brought to power in 1799, There was two basic rules that Napoleon set out his the beginning of the French Revolution: "eqaulity in law and protection of property." Although Napoleon demonstrated his abilities of protecting the French, the rights that were given were restricted.D. Woman did not have the basic political rights.When Napoleon restricted rights to individual, this mainly applied to the women.
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    10:32 am
  3. page Bolivar's Dreams for Latin America edited ... 77. Arismendi Posada, Ignacio; Gobernantes Colombianos, trans. Colombian Presidents; Interprin…
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    77. Arismendi Posada, Ignacio; Gobernantes Colombianos, trans. Colombian Presidents; Interprint Editors Ltd.; Italgraf; Segunda Edición; Page 10; Bogotá, Colombia; 1983
    88. http://www.carpenoctem.tv/military/bolivar.html.
    99. Photo: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Congreso_de_C%C3%BAcuta.jpg
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    9:05 am
  4. page Bolivar's Dreams for Latin America edited ... More than anyone, I desire to see America fashioned into the greatest nation in the world, gre…
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    More than anyone, I desire to see America fashioned into the greatest nation in the world, greatest not so much by virtue of her area and wealth as by her freedom and glory. Although I seek perfection for the government of my coun­try, I cannot persuade myself that the New World can, at the moment, be organized as a great republic. Since it is impossible, I dare not desire it; yet much less do I desire to have all America a monarchy because this plan is not only impracticable but also impossible. Wrongs now existing could nor be righted, and our emancipation would be fruitless. The American states need the care of paternal governments to heal the sores and wounds of despotism and war. . . .From the foregoing, we can draw these conclu­sions: The American provinces are fighting for their freedom, and they will ultimately succeed. Some provinces as a matter of course will form federal and some central republics; the larger areas will inevitably establish monarchies, some of which will fare so badly that they will disinte­grate in either present or future revolutions. To consolidate a great monarchy will be no easy task, but it will be utterly impossible to consoli­date a great republic. . . . When success is not assured, when the state is weak, and when results are distantly seen, all men hesitate; opinion is divided, passions rage, and the enemy fans these passions in order to win an easy victory because of them. As soon as we are strong and under the guidance of a liberal nation which will lend us her protection, we will achieve accord in cultivating the virtues and tal­ents that lead to glory. Then will we march ma­jestically toward that great prosperity for which South America is destined. . . ,
    Bolivar's main purpose for writing, "The Jamaica Letter," was to show other South Americans how unfairly they were being treated. Bolivar believed they were being treated like surfs. Also, he mentioned how their rights were being infringed upon. Bolivar was convinced that South American countries needed to break free from Spanish rule.
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    of Cúcuta 9
    Bolivar's views on government were more democratic, rather than to continue the monarchy system. His views and principles were based mainly from the Enlightenment and republicanism. In this document Simon Bolivar is saying that even if the Americas have won their independence, they still aren't a fully liberated society, based on the issues on inequality. He stated that, Politically they were non-existent. "We are still in a position lower than slavery, and therefore it is more difficult for us to rise to the enjoyment of freedom," meaning that compared to the greed and power of Spain, the citizens of the Americas were still fighting for their freedom because they type of government they needed wasn't established yet.
    In the lectures by Sepinwall on Monday she stated that after the American, French and Latin American Revolutions, one of their biggest challenges was establishing a working and productive system of government. She stated that this type of change was harder because when a society has become accustomed to one system of government and laws, it takes a lot of time to change all this and make laws that are suitable for everyone. She also stated that after the American Revolution it took two drafts of the Constitution before they got it right, whereas after the French and Latin American Revolutions it took them constant tries before establishing a working government.
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    66. Photo: http://ellidavis.com/toronto-real-estate-news/2009/03/private-travel-to-cuba
    77. Arismendi Posada, Ignacio; Gobernantes Colombianos, trans. Colombian Presidents; Interprint Editors Ltd.; Italgraf; Segunda Edición; Page 10; Bogotá, Colombia; 1983
    88. http://www.carpenoctem.tv/military/bolivar.htmlhttp://www.carpenoctem.tv/military/bolivar.html.
    99. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Congreso_de_C%C3%BAcuta.jpg

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    9:04 am

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